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Keena Kimmel’s articles

Mini book review: Student loans and stashing money

“Walden on Wheels: On the Open Road From Debt to Freedom,” by Ken Ilgunas, is the author’s account of tackling $32,000 in student loan debt, while simultaneously stashing money in the bank and earning a master’s degree.

After graduating with a bachelor’s degree from the University at Buffalo, Ilgunas moved to Coldfoot,...

Mini book review: “The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse”

British author Robert Rankin’s 33 novels are hard to categorize. He’s long described his work as “far-fetched fiction,” hoping to garner his own shelf in bookshops. (Usually though, you’ll find him shelved in science fiction.) Rankin’s a teller of tall tales, with fantastical plots and a distinctive, playful style.

His...

Mini book review: ‘Song of Increase,’ by Jacqueline Freeman

I began dabbling in beekeeping in 2010. Over the years, I came to understand what Thoreau meant when he said, “The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.” I’ve learned what not to do – the less interference, the better. My only real contribution is that of negotiator with hungry bears; everything else they handle...

Mini book review: “Collected Poems: 1947-1997,” by Allen Ginsberg

Some people rescue stray dogs, I rescue wayward books. You know the ones – those lonely volumes that practically whimper amidst their shelf-mates, once mighty dandelions growing through the cracks, since flung into a sea of used airport fiction. I recently rescued “Collected Poems: 1947-1997,” by Allen Ginsberg. I’m a sucker...

Mini book review: ‘The Joy Makers,’ by James Edwin Gunn

Happiness. We’re all after it, right? The founders of the republic apparently thought so, as it was written into our Constitution as an inalienable human right. But, what if the achievement of mass happiness proved both counter-productive and destructive to creativity and health? “The Joy Makers” was first published by James...

Mini book review: ‘The Art of Frugal Hedonism: A Guide to Spending Less While Enjoying Everything More,’ by Annie-Raser-Rowland and Adam Grubb

Passing through Durango in 2000, I decided I couldn’t leave; I’d been searching for home and found it. A guy warned me shortly after arriving that Durango is a “two dog, three job town.” Sadly, I’ve seen many folks skip town since, reluctantly moving on, in search of cheaper rent. There are endless free adventures awaiting...

Mini book review: ‘The Man Who Quit Money,” by Mark Sundeen

In a world preoccupied by the almighty dollar, Daniel Suelo sought more.“The Man Who Quit Money,” by Mark Sundeen, is a thought-provoking account of one man’s journey toward radical simplicity – from fundamentalist student to cave-dwelling sadhu. In the fall of 2000, Suelo gave away the 30 bucks in his pocket, hasn’t spent a...

Mini book review: ‘All the Light We Cannot See,’ by Anthony Doerr

Destined to become a classic in American literature, “All the Light We Cannot See,” by Anthony Doerr, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2015. Broken into short segments, it’s nearly impossible to put down – one of those “just one more chapter” reads that will blur evening into dawn in a flash.

The book is a tale...

Mini book review: ‘American Gods,’ by Neil Gaiman

As immigrants flocked from all points of the globe to this melting pot we call the U.S. of A., they brought their gods with them. Sadly, most of these deities are all but forgotten. What if those gods are still among us in human form, their immortality painfully ticking by as they eke out trivial existences like the rest of...

Mini book review: ‘Holidays on Ice,’ by David Sedaris

Holiday chaos gotcha feeling frazzled? Well then, first, make yourself something strong for sippin.’ Then, find a seat out of earshot of all that holly, jolly muzak and a copy of “Holidays on Ice,” by David Sedaris. This little gem, if it’s not there already, is destined to join the ranks of your holiday re-read...

Mini book review: ‘Grandma Gatewood’s Walk,’ by Ben Montgomery

In the spring of 1955, Emma Gatewood told her 11 children that she was going for a walk. What she didn’t tell them was that she planned to hike the entirety of the Appalachian Trail – by herself. By then, she was a 67-year-old great-grandmother, and had been planning the details of her adventure for quite some...

Mini book review: ‘The Power of One,” by Bryce Courtenay

Set in South Africa during Apartheid, “The Power of One,” by Bryce Courtenay, is an inspiring coming-of-age tale. “Peekay,” a precocious, British runt, is ruthlessly bullied at boarding school. After a serendipitous meeting with boxer “Kid Louis” Groenewald, Peekay is inspired to fight back and sets out to learn his new craft...

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