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Kinks, butt plugs, and STIs: Horny the Sex Box is here to answer FLC students’ sex-related questions

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Screenshot of the @hornythesexbox Instagram page.
Ar 190409894
Screenshot of the @hornythesexbox Instagram page.

Kinks, butt plugs, and STIs: Horny the Sex Box is here to answer FLC students’ sex-related questions

Screenshot of the @hornythesexbox Instagram page.

Is it normal to enjoy eating dat ass? How can I tell if I have an STD? Can you get pregnant from anal? These are all real questions submitted to Horny the Sex Box, and let’s be honest ... we’re all lying to ourselves if we haven’t thought about some of them at least once.

Luckily, Horny the Sex Box knows everyone is secretly Googling these questions on their phones when they’re bored during class or work and is now answering the questions to life’s greatest mysteries.

According to Westword, Fort Lewis College students in Durango can now anonymously submit any pressing sex-related questions they have to Horny the Sex Box, an Instagram account and question box at the college’s student union. Just message the Instagram account or drop a slip of paper with your question on it into the box.

The organizers of the sex-positive program, FLC seniors Matisse Monty and Kaidee Akullo, will answer your questions, judgment-free, like, “What does ‘bustin a fat one’ mean?” (slang for ejaculation) or “Are butt plugs dangerous?” (not if used correctly!).

Monty was inspired to start the program after she did an internship at Durango’s Planned Parenthood, where she worked on In Case You’re Curious, a texting program and Instagram account that also allows people to submit sex-related questions. She partnered up with her friend, Akullo, and the two public-health majors tweaked the idea so it was more geared toward college students.

“One thing we try to do is to recognize that a lot of times, the sex education system is made for only one population, the white male population,” Akullo told Westword. “That’s seen as dominant. So when we’re presenting information, we make sure we’re representing people of color, queer people, people with differently abled bodies.”

“Some of them are jokes, definitely,” Monty said in an interview with Westword. “But people can hide behind humor. So we try and treat everything like a real question and make the most out of it in terms of educating people.”

Amanda Push