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Love it or Hate it: Eddie Redmayne

Ar 161139985
Associated Press

Eddie Redmayne
Ar 161139985
Associated Press

Eddie Redmayne

Love it or Hate it: Eddie Redmayne

Associated Press

Eddie Redmayne

Love it Eddie Redmayne’s grandma absolutely loves his newest movie, “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them.” I love that Eddie Redmayne loves his grams enough to talk about how excited she is for his wizard role. I haven’t seen it yet, but I’m going to sometime this week purely based on her.

Full truth, I don’t know if Eddie Redmayne’s a booknerd, but he looks like one. I am bookpeople. I love bookpeople. I love people who look like bookpeople. As often as he’s seen in Prada and slick suits, Redmayne wears cable knit, Hemingway sweaters and appears as if he should be toting poetry chapbooks by an old-timey strap. ::swoons::

Even if Eddie Redmayne isn’t bookpeople, he picks literary movie roles that are killer. I mean, come on, “Les Mis,” “Pillars of the Earth,” “Tess of the D’Urbervilles,” and “The Danish Girl”? Um, yes. Costume dramas are my kinda get-down. Sure, sure, “The Other Boleyn Girl” was meh, but he was beautiful in it.

When he’s not slaying on the silver screen, he’s a patron for MNDA, the Motor Neurone Disease Association. He got hooked into the British charity during his role as Stephen Hawking in “The Theory of Everything.” More recently, he’s working with J.K. Rowling’s Lumos Foundation, a charity dedicated to revolutionizing the orphanage system. Yup, down-to-earth, talented actor does charity work. ::double swoon::

And to be totally ridic, dude is hot. I love gingers. Yeah, yeah, he’s not a true ginger. He’s a brunette. But let’s pretend. Besides, even if you put a red wig on a lamppost, I’m bound to lean on it.

— Patty Templeton Hate itWe all have those actors who infuse us with a deep, irrational hatred. Eddie Redmayne is that man for me – a performer I do not quite respect, who irritates me to the point of anger. The projects he commits to are frequently a specific breed of phony, corny, Oscar-bait, usually sumptuous and insincere period dramas; “The Theory of Everything” (for which he won an undeserved Academy Award), “Les Misérables,” “The Danish Girl.”

I can grudgingly admit Redmayne seems a hard worker who doesn’t choose easy films wherein he plays a slightly altered version of himself. He definitely transforms. Redmayne’s most offensive turns have come in “Danish Girl,” where he portrays a transgender 20th century painter, and in “Theory of Everything,” playing the venerable disabled physicist Stephen Hawking. These are prestige flicks, more concerned with being Affective and Important than interesting or challenging. In each role, Redmayne illustrates an iconic personage with exaggerated and obvious effort. It’s impressive when he assumes the affectations of Hawking’s crumpled neck and twisting hands – but he doesn’t draw you inside the character, he merely reminds you how hard he’s working to become him. As Lili in “Danish Girl,” he similarly imitates the femininity of a woman with shamefully exaggerated, clichéd body language.

There’s something about his too-earnest face, his simpering smile, his pandering manner in every single press interview. Redmayne doesn’t appear to hold much complexity or darkness. He doesn’t defy your expectations. He doesn’t say anything of interest. He’s nice and enthusiastic, but it’s not enough for me.

— Anya Jaremko-Greenwold