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The state of weed: Where does cannabis stand in the wake of the 2020 election?

Groups pushing for legalization

While Colorado and the rest of the country wait on federal legislators to enact protections, what other groups continue to lobby and work towards the ultimate goal of legalized weed across the country?
Since the 70s, several grass-roots and highly-organized advocacy and industry groups have been pushing for medical and recreational cannabis legalization across the U.S. While there are too many groups to name within this article, some of the larger are: The Marijuana Policy Project (MPP) National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), Drug Policy Alliance (DPA), and National Cannabis Industry Association.
The Baltimore Business Journal reports that on Nov. 12 a nonpartisan group of cannabis regulators announced the formation of the Cannabis Regulators Association (CANNRA). The group includes regulators from Colorado and 18 other states: DE, HI, IL, IA, LA, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, NE, NJ, NY, ND, OR, RI, UT, and WA.
“The association will strive to create and promote harmony and standardization across jurisdictions which choose to legalize and regulate cannabis,” said Norman Birenbaum, director of Cannabis Programs for New York State, and CANNRA’s president. “[CANNRA] will also work to ensure federal officials benefit from the vast experiences of states across the nation to ensure any changes to federal law adequately address states’ needs and priorities.”
The group’s formal position is that it will provide objective information on regulatory issues without advocacy for or against cannabis legalization. In a statement on CANNRA’s website www.cann-ra.org founding member Jim Burack, Director of Colorado’s Marijuana Enforcement Division, said “CANNRA provides a forum for Colorado to continue to share our pioneering experience creating an effective and credible regulated framework and market for cannabis. Colorado also benefits from learning about the cannabis policy work in other states across the country.”
While the idea of multi-state cooperation on cannabis regulations sounds like a step in the right direction, it is always of concern when advocacy and industry participants are excluded from influential regulatory advisory groups. CANNRA does not allow cannabis industry participants or advocacy organizations to join.

Nick Gonzales/Illustration for DGO
Groups pushing for legalization

While Colorado and the rest of the country wait on federal legislators to enact protections, what other groups continue to lobby and work towards the ultimate goal of legalized weed across the country?
Since the 70s, several grass-roots and highly-organized advocacy and industry groups have been pushing for medical and recreational cannabis legalization across the U.S. While there are too many groups to name within this article, some of the larger are: The Marijuana Policy Project (MPP) National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), Drug Policy Alliance (DPA), and National Cannabis Industry Association.
The Baltimore Business Journal reports that on Nov. 12 a nonpartisan group of cannabis regulators announced the formation of the Cannabis Regulators Association (CANNRA). The group includes regulators from Colorado and 18 other states: DE, HI, IL, IA, LA, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, NE, NJ, NY, ND, OR, RI, UT, and WA.
“The association will strive to create and promote harmony and standardization across jurisdictions which choose to legalize and regulate cannabis,” said Norman Birenbaum, director of Cannabis Programs for New York State, and CANNRA’s president. “[CANNRA] will also work to ensure federal officials benefit from the vast experiences of states across the nation to ensure any changes to federal law adequately address states’ needs and priorities.”
The group’s formal position is that it will provide objective information on regulatory issues without advocacy for or against cannabis legalization. In a statement on CANNRA’s website www.cann-ra.org founding member Jim Burack, Director of Colorado’s Marijuana Enforcement Division, said “CANNRA provides a forum for Colorado to continue to share our pioneering experience creating an effective and credible regulated framework and market for cannabis. Colorado also benefits from learning about the cannabis policy work in other states across the country.”
While the idea of multi-state cooperation on cannabis regulations sounds like a step in the right direction, it is always of concern when advocacy and industry participants are excluded from influential regulatory advisory groups. CANNRA does not allow cannabis industry participants or advocacy organizations to join.